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Triple Threat for Cancer
Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.
Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Triple Threat for Cancer

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.

Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Tags drug delivery chemotherapy cancer nanotechnology future science health

 Source newsoffice.mit.edu

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.
The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.
Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.

The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.

Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Tags levitation technology tech magnetic levitation high speed rail future transport

Emotion detectors to protect you from yourself…err, make for a safer ride
With many models of self-driving cars already in the making we know the near future has chauffeured rides in store for everyone. But what if you love driving too much to give it up to a robot car and still be just as safe?
Technology now allows us to read facial expressions and identify which of the seven universal emotions a person is feeling: fear, anger, joy, sadness, disgust, surprise or suspicion. We know that in addition to fatigue, the emotional state of the driver is a risk factor. Irritation, in particular, can make drivers more aggressive and less attentive. EPFL researchers, in collaboration with PSA Peugeot Citroën, have developed an on-board emotion detector based on the analysis of facial expressions. Tests carried out using a prototype indicate that the idea could have promising applications.
The positives?
Detecting emotions is only one indicator for improving driver safety and comfort. In this project, it was coupled with a fatigue detector that measures the percentage of eyelid closure.
 
The next steps?
Works are also being done on detecting other states on drivers’ faces such as distraction, and on lip reading for use in vocal recognition.

 

Emotion detectors to protect you from yourself…err, make for a safer ride

With many models of self-driving cars already in the making we know the near future has chauffeured rides in store for everyone. But what if you love driving too much to give it up to a robot car and still be just as safe?

Technology now allows us to read facial expressions and identify which of the seven universal emotions a person is feeling: fear, anger, joy, sadness, disgust, surprise or suspicion. We know that in addition to fatigue, the emotional state of the driver is a risk factor. Irritation, in particular, can make drivers more aggressive and less attentive. EPFL researchers, in collaboration with PSA Peugeot Citroën, have developed an on-board emotion detector based on the analysis of facial expressions. Tests carried out using a prototype indicate that the idea could have promising applications.

The positives?

Detecting emotions is only one indicator for improving driver safety and comfort. In this project, it was coupled with a fatigue detector that measures the percentage of eyelid closure.

 

The next steps?

Works are also being done on detecting other states on drivers’ faces such as distraction, and on lip reading for use in vocal recognition.

 

Tags tech future driving

The future of medicine.
Not quite the Star Trek type handheld tri-coder, but this dinky little thing is definitely a move into the right direction. 
Only 7.5 cm high, weighing a mere 60g and able to detect viruses and single layer proteins down to 3 nm thick this device is powerful.
Why should we care?
It is able to detect a large number of proteins in our body all at once, opening up the possibility that one day we can do check ups without even seeing a doctor. 
Promising future
The size, price and efficiency of this new multi-analyze device make it a highly promising invention for a multiplicity of uses. It could offer to quickly analyze up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample. This method could simultaneously identify insulin levels, cancer and Alzheimer markers, or even certain viruses. 
Read more on this here.

The future of medicine.

Not quite the Star Trek type handheld tri-coder, but this dinky little thing is definitely a move into the right direction. 

Only 7.5 cm high, weighing a mere 60g and able to detect viruses and single layer proteins down to 3 nm thick this device is powerful.

Why should we care?

It is able to detect a large number of proteins in our body all at once, opening up the possibility that one day we can do check ups without even seeing a doctor. 

Promising future

The size, price and efficiency of this new multi-analyze device make it a highly promising invention for a multiplicity of uses. It could offer to quickly analyze up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample. This method could simultaneously identify insulin levels, cancer and Alzheimer markers, or even certain viruses. 

Read more on this here.

Tags medicine lab on a chip chip technology Biotechnology tech future future of medicince

Green energy from the bottom of the sea
First we got wind turbines to generate energy and now it seems scientists have found a way to tap the energy force of waves….
The device, pictured above, involves two air chambers: as a wave passes over the top of the first chamber, the pressure inside increases, forcing air through a passageway to the second chamber. Inside the passageway is a turbine, so the passing air is actually what generates the electricity. As the wave continues on, it raises the pressure inside the second chamber, pushing the air back through the turbine — importantly, it is a bidirectional turbine — and back into the first chamber. Another wave, another cycle. Repeat.
Find out here how powerful this device can be.

Green energy from the bottom of the sea

First we got wind turbines to generate energy and now it seems scientists have found a way to tap the energy force of waves….

The device, pictured above, involves two air chambers: as a wave passes over the top of the first chamber, the pressure inside increases, forcing air through a passageway to the second chamber. Inside the passageway is a turbine, so the passing air is actually what generates the electricity. As the wave continues on, it raises the pressure inside the second chamber, pushing the air back through the turbine — importantly, it is a bidirectional turbine — and back into the first chamber. Another wave, another cycle. Repeat.

Find out here how powerful this device can be.

Tags future tech Green Energy

 Source news.discovery.com

Mechanising the human body - the marriage of man and machine

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Exciting news from the BBC: A man fitted with a bionic arm has regained his sense of ‘feel’.

Dennis Aabo, who lost his left hand in a firework accident nearly a decade ago, said the hand was “amazing”.

In laboratory tests he was able to tell the shape and stiffness of objects he picked up, even when blindfolded.

Although still in trial phase the success of this project is promising. 

It will undoubtedly be very expensive, well beyond the means of most patients. And artificial hands still lack the precision and dexterity of the real thing.

For now the super-functioning bionic hand of science fiction films remains the stuff of fiction.

Tags science bionic prosthetic health technology future

 Source BBC

Forget Disneyland! This is the theme park of the future: The world’s first robot theme park is scheduled to open in 2016 in South Korea. Robot Land will be located in Incheon, just west of Seoul.

Tags future robots theme park robot land

A robot able to play touch screen games like Cut the Rope can judge whether humans will find a new device responsive.
Software developers currently pay companies like Sauce Labs to test apps using either human workers or software that emulates a phone or Web browser. Having a robotic third option could be useful, and predicts that robotic testing of all kinds of computing devices will become more common.
Why it matters
Understanding what influences people’s perceptions of their gadgets could improve future designs.

A robot able to play touch screen games like Cut the Rope can judge whether humans will find a new device responsive.

Software developers currently pay companies like Sauce Labs to test apps using either human workers or software that emulates a phone or Web browser. Having a robotic third option could be useful, and predicts that robotic testing of all kinds of computing devices will become more common.

Why it matters

Understanding what influences people’s perceptions of their gadgets could improve future designs.

Tags science tech future robots human robot interation