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Sunny skies at turn of a light switch.
 The New Scientist is reporting on this new lighting system which combines white LEDs with light-scattering nanoparticles to mimic a natural sunny day. 
The white LEDs as a source shine through a clear plastic panel studded with nanoparticles that scatter light in the same way as Earth’s atmosphere does with sunlight. Different panels can simulate various outdoor light conditions – from a bright sunny day to a gorgeous sunset or even the brooding skies of a storm.
Sunny days all year round? Now THAT would be nice. 

Sunny skies at turn of a light switch.

The New Scientist is reporting on this new lighting system which combines white LEDs with light-scattering nanoparticles to mimic a natural sunny day. 

The white LEDs as a source shine through a clear plastic panel studded with nanoparticles that scatter light in the same way as Earth’s atmosphere does with sunlight. Different panels can simulate various outdoor light conditions – from a bright sunny day to a gorgeous sunset or even the brooding skies of a storm.

Sunny days all year round? Now THAT would be nice. 

Tags science LED innovation lighting design natural light simulation technology nanoparticles

 Source newscientist.com

You too can make Nobel Prize winning, super-material Graphene! 
Here is how:
First, pour some graphite powder into a blender. Add water and dishwashing liquid, and mix at high speed. Congratulations, you just made the wonder material graphene.
This surprisingly simple recipe is now the easiest way to mass-produce pure graphene – sheets of carbon just one atom thick. 
If you need a reminder on graphene and its super powers then read up on it here.

You too can make Nobel Prize winning, super-material Graphene!

Here is how:

First, pour some graphite powder into a blender. Add water and dishwashing liquid, and mix at high speed. Congratulations, you just made the wonder material graphene.

This surprisingly simple recipe is now the easiest way to mass-produce pure graphene – sheets of carbon just one atom thick. 

If you need a reminder on graphene and its super powers then read up on it here.

Tags graphene Nobel Prize science physics

 Source newscientist.com

We are star stuff:

Lessons of Immortality and Mortality From My Father by Sasha Sagan

An excerpt from the published article on NYMag

………………………………….

One day when I was still very young, I asked my father about his parents. I knew my maternal grandparents intimately, but I wanted to know why I had never met his parents.

“Because they died,” he said wistfully.

“Will you ever see them again?” I asked.

He considered his answer carefully. Finally, he said that there was nothing he would like more in the world than to see his mother and father again, but that he had no reason — and no evidence — to support the idea of an afterlife, so he couldn’t give in to the temptation.

“Why?”

Then he told me, very tenderly, that it can be dangerous to believe things just because you want them to be true.

………………………………….

Read the full article here.

Tags space carl sagan inspirational science

Triple Threat for Cancer
Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.
Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Triple Threat for Cancer

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.

Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Tags drug delivery chemotherapy cancer nanotechnology future science health

 Source newsoffice.mit.edu

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.
The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.
Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.

The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.

Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Tags levitation technology tech magnetic levitation high speed rail future transport

World’s highest wind turbine to provide Alaska with half-price energy
Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community like far-flung villages, military bases, mines, or disaster zones.
Altaeros’ Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) is an inflatable, helium-filled ring with a wind turbine suspended inside. It will float at a height of 300 meters, where winds tend to be far stronger than they are on the ground. The altitude of the BAT is about double the hub height of the world’s largest wind turbine.
Why it matters
The technology can be set up in under 24 hours, because it does not require cranes or underground foundations. Instead it uses high-strength tethers, which hold the BAT steady and allow the electricity to be sent back to the ground.
Better yet
It is expected to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska.

World’s highest wind turbine to provide Alaska with half-price energy

Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community like far-flung villages, military bases, mines, or disaster zones.

Altaeros’ Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) is an inflatable, helium-filled ring with a wind turbine suspended inside. It will float at a height of 300 meters, where winds tend to be far stronger than they are on the ground. The altitude of the BAT is about double the hub height of the world’s largest wind turbine.

Why it matters

The technology can be set up in under 24 hours, because it does not require cranes or underground foundations. Instead it uses high-strength tethers, which hold the BAT steady and allow the electricity to be sent back to the ground.

Better yet

It is expected to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska.

Tags tech science energy alaska Buoyant Airborne Turbine

Wanna bet?
Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 
Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.
Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

Wanna bet?

Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 

Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.

Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

Tags physics the big bang theory gravitational waves science news hawking futurejam

 Source theguardian.com