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Triple Threat for Cancer
Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.
Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Triple Threat for Cancer

Delivering chemotherapy drugs in nanoparticle form could help reduce side effects by targeting the drugs directly to the tumors. In recent years, scientists have developed nanoparticles that deliver one or two chemotherapy drugs, but it has been difficult to design particles that can carry any more than that in a precise ratio.

Now MIT chemists have devised a new way to build such nanoparticles, making it much easier to include three or more different drugs. In a paper published in the Journal of the American Chemical Society, the researchers showed that they could load their particles with three drugs commonly used to treat ovarian cancer.

The scientists envision the ability to reliably produce large quantities of multidrug-carrying nanoparticles will enable large-scale testing of possible new cancer treatments.

Tags drug delivery chemotherapy cancer nanotechnology future science health

 Source newsoffice.mit.edu

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.
The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.
Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Magnetic-levitation technology works by creating magnetic fields with onboard superconducting magnets, which interact with ground coils in the rail, allowing a whole train to “float” just above the ground (about 10 centimetres). And go really fast: speeds of 310 mph / 500 kph.

The Maglev technology was designed by the Japanese rail operator JR Tokai and promises New York to D.C. in an hour flat. That would be an hour and 40 minutes faster than today’s 150-mph Amtrak Acela trains, which are at this point the fastest in the United States. In most cases, it would also be significantly faster than flying.

Whilst JR Tokai is offering the license up for free to the US it also aims to bring a maglev line connecting Tokyo and Nagoya onstream in 2027.  

Tags levitation technology tech magnetic levitation high speed rail future transport

World’s highest wind turbine to provide Alaska with half-price energy
Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community like far-flung villages, military bases, mines, or disaster zones.
Altaeros’ Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) is an inflatable, helium-filled ring with a wind turbine suspended inside. It will float at a height of 300 meters, where winds tend to be far stronger than they are on the ground. The altitude of the BAT is about double the hub height of the world’s largest wind turbine.
Why it matters
The technology can be set up in under 24 hours, because it does not require cranes or underground foundations. Instead it uses high-strength tethers, which hold the BAT steady and allow the electricity to be sent back to the ground.
Better yet
It is expected to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska.

World’s highest wind turbine to provide Alaska with half-price energy

Altaeros Energies will launch its high-altitude floating wind turbine south of Fairbanks to bring more affordable power to a remote community like far-flung villages, military bases, mines, or disaster zones.

Altaeros’ Buoyant Airborne Turbine (BAT) is an inflatable, helium-filled ring with a wind turbine suspended inside. It will float at a height of 300 meters, where winds tend to be far stronger than they are on the ground. The altitude of the BAT is about double the hub height of the world’s largest wind turbine.

Why it matters

The technology can be set up in under 24 hours, because it does not require cranes or underground foundations. Instead it uses high-strength tethers, which hold the BAT steady and allow the electricity to be sent back to the ground.

Better yet

It is expected to provide power at about $0.18 per kilowatt-hour, about half the price of off-grid electricity in Alaska.

Tags tech science energy alaska Buoyant Airborne Turbine

Wanna bet?
Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 
Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.
Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

Wanna bet?

Professor Hawking won his bet with director of the Perimeter Institute in Canada Neil Turok after wagering that gravitational waves from the first fleeting moments after the big bang would be detected. 

Turok is said to be needing more evidence before conceding the bet. He said the bet rested on results from the European Space Agency’s Planck space telescope, which last year failed to spot any signs of gravitational waves.

Hawking is well known for making bets with other scientists. He recently lost $100 to Gordon Kane at the University of Michigan after betting that scientists at Cern, home of the Large Hadron Collider near Geneva, would not find the Higgs boson. They discovered the particle in July 2012.

Tags physics the big bang theory gravitational waves science news hawking futurejam

 Source theguardian.com

Emotion detectors to protect you from yourself…err, make for a safer ride
With many models of self-driving cars already in the making we know the near future has chauffeured rides in store for everyone. But what if you love driving too much to give it up to a robot car and still be just as safe?
Technology now allows us to read facial expressions and identify which of the seven universal emotions a person is feeling: fear, anger, joy, sadness, disgust, surprise or suspicion. We know that in addition to fatigue, the emotional state of the driver is a risk factor. Irritation, in particular, can make drivers more aggressive and less attentive. EPFL researchers, in collaboration with PSA Peugeot Citroën, have developed an on-board emotion detector based on the analysis of facial expressions. Tests carried out using a prototype indicate that the idea could have promising applications.
The positives?
Detecting emotions is only one indicator for improving driver safety and comfort. In this project, it was coupled with a fatigue detector that measures the percentage of eyelid closure.
 
The next steps?
Works are also being done on detecting other states on drivers’ faces such as distraction, and on lip reading for use in vocal recognition.

 

Emotion detectors to protect you from yourself…err, make for a safer ride

With many models of self-driving cars already in the making we know the near future has chauffeured rides in store for everyone. But what if you love driving too much to give it up to a robot car and still be just as safe?

Technology now allows us to read facial expressions and identify which of the seven universal emotions a person is feeling: fear, anger, joy, sadness, disgust, surprise or suspicion. We know that in addition to fatigue, the emotional state of the driver is a risk factor. Irritation, in particular, can make drivers more aggressive and less attentive. EPFL researchers, in collaboration with PSA Peugeot Citroën, have developed an on-board emotion detector based on the analysis of facial expressions. Tests carried out using a prototype indicate that the idea could have promising applications.

The positives?

Detecting emotions is only one indicator for improving driver safety and comfort. In this project, it was coupled with a fatigue detector that measures the percentage of eyelid closure.

 

The next steps?

Works are also being done on detecting other states on drivers’ faces such as distraction, and on lip reading for use in vocal recognition.

 

Tags tech future driving

Wanted: Volunteers to knit little woolly jumpers for poorly penguins
A conservation group in Australia is calling on knitting enthusiasts to donate small woolly jumpers for sick penguins.
Phillip Island’s Penguin Foundation uses the jumpers to help rehabilitate birds that have been affected by oil spills or similar leaks from fishing boats.
Knits for Nature, a program run by the foundation, has created up to 300 different designs over the years thanks to its team of dedicated volunteers but is always in need of more.
Download the knitting patterns here. 

The jumpers help to keep the penguins warm and also prevent them trying to clean the toxic oil away with their beaks.

Wanted: Volunteers to knit little woolly jumpers for poorly penguins

A conservation group in Australia is calling on knitting enthusiasts to donate small woolly jumpers for sick penguins.

Phillip Island’s Penguin Foundation uses the jumpers to help rehabilitate birds that have been affected by oil spills or similar leaks from fishing boats.

Knits for Nature, a program run by the foundation, has created up to 300 different designs over the years thanks to its team of dedicated volunteers but is always in need of more.

Download the knitting patterns here. 

The jumpers help to keep the penguins warm and also prevent them trying to clean the toxic oil away with their beaks.

Tags penguins wild life conservation environment

The future of medicine.
Not quite the Star Trek type handheld tri-coder, but this dinky little thing is definitely a move into the right direction. 
Only 7.5 cm high, weighing a mere 60g and able to detect viruses and single layer proteins down to 3 nm thick this device is powerful.
Why should we care?
It is able to detect a large number of proteins in our body all at once, opening up the possibility that one day we can do check ups without even seeing a doctor. 
Promising future
The size, price and efficiency of this new multi-analyze device make it a highly promising invention for a multiplicity of uses. It could offer to quickly analyze up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample. This method could simultaneously identify insulin levels, cancer and Alzheimer markers, or even certain viruses. 
Read more on this here.

The future of medicine.

Not quite the Star Trek type handheld tri-coder, but this dinky little thing is definitely a move into the right direction. 

Only 7.5 cm high, weighing a mere 60g and able to detect viruses and single layer proteins down to 3 nm thick this device is powerful.

Why should we care?

It is able to detect a large number of proteins in our body all at once, opening up the possibility that one day we can do check ups without even seeing a doctor. 

Promising future

The size, price and efficiency of this new multi-analyze device make it a highly promising invention for a multiplicity of uses. It could offer to quickly analyze up to 170,000 different molecules in a blood sample. This method could simultaneously identify insulin levels, cancer and Alzheimer markers, or even certain viruses. 

Read more on this here.

Tags medicine lab on a chip chip technology Biotechnology tech future future of medicince